Adise - Caucasian Flour Halva. Photo: Alona Eisenberg.
Adise - Caucasian Flour Halva. Photo: Alona Eisenberg.
Recipe

Adise/khasolot – Caucasian Flour “Halva”

Adise, is a sweet that shows the ability of Caucasian women to produce delicacies from basic raw materials - white flour, sugar and butter

It was only two years ago that I found out that our mothers, and grandmothers, used to make adise and lobush totoi – pan bread, reminiscent of the Chinese bing and the Indian paratha – as their mishloach manot for Purim. ADISE, which in some places is called “acido” or “khasolot” is a sweet that impresses me with its simplicity, and testifies to the ability of Caucasian women to produce delicacies from basic raw materials – white flour, sugar and butter – a little resourcefulness and a great deal of manual labor.

Yes, there is a difficult task ahead of you – the butter and flour are cooked into a batter, which caramelizes over a long period while constantly stirring. This process gives the flour a nutty flavor and aroma, which makes one wonder “what exactly is in it?”. To give Adise a festive look, the women of the community used to stick pieces of walnuts into each halvah piece. You can also cut patterns into it with a knife, or use dough stamps.

Ingredients for Adise Flour Halva

  • 8.8 oz (250 grams) butter
  • 3¼ cups (400 grams) flour
  • 1¾ (200 grams) confectioner's sugar

Instructions

  • 1. In a wide, flat pot, melt the butter over medium-low heat.

  • 2. Gradually add flour while constantly stirring to prevent the flour from burning. Continue stirring for 30-40 minutes. At first the mixture will be sandy and crumbly, after about 30 minutes the color will turn deep golden and the mixture will be moist and have the texture of soft clay.

  • 3. At this stage, remove from the flame, add confectioner's sugar and mix well for 2-3 minutes until the confectioner's sugar is evenly distributed.

  • 4. Immediately transfer to 2 flat serving plates. Using a wooden spoon, flatten the halva, sprinkle with walnut halves and press them in a little so that they sink into the hot mixture.

  • 5. Cut with a sharp knife into small cubes and let cool. Cut through again until the cubes come off.

  • 6. Keep in a sealed box for up to a week. You can also keep it in the freezer for much longer.

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The recipe is taken from the blog “Baloosha” by Alona Eisenberg, a cook and baker who studies the cuisines of the Jews of the Caucasus and hosts private events and workshops.

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