• Leah and Ido, my grandchildren, happily join the Platikos assembly.: "Platikos" - Sephardic mishloach manot. SARA SUFRIN
    Leah and Ido, my grandchildren, happily join the Platikos assembly.: "Platikos" - Sephardic mishloach manot. SARA SUFRIN
  • Mishloach Manot that combine East and West: marzipan, hamantaschen and bourekitas di muez. "Platikos" - Sephardic mishloach manot. Sara Sufrin
    Mishloach Manot that combine East and West: marzipan, hamantaschen and bourekitas di muez. "Platikos" - Sephardic mishloach manot. Sara Sufrin
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Platikos – Sephardic Mishloach Manot

Mishloach manot are one of the Purim mitzvahs, and some say the purpose of the mitzvah is to foster the comradery between men.

Some say that the purpose of the mitzvah on Purim is to help the poor who are ashamed to ask for charity, so that they can celebrate the Purim meal without shame.
The well-known mishloach manot contain sweets for the most part and hamantaschen – dough pastries in the shape of a triangle, with a sweet filling. The origin of the pastry is in Central Europe, but these pastries were not known among the Ladino-speaking population.

Platikos is what we called misloach manot delivered to fellow Ladino speakers, and they contained pastries and other sweets, for example:

Bourekitas de muez (or travadikos) – small dough pockets filled with nuts and dipped in sugar/honey syrup.

Baklava – layers of phyllo dough filled with nuts, cinnamon and honey.

Tajikos di Masapan – pieces of marzipan.

Bizis – Meringue Kisses.

Marojinos – almond cookies.

and more.

There were also special pastries called Foulares, the name is probably a bastardization of the word PILAR, which means column, reminiscent of the hanging pole on which Haman was hung. The shape of the pastry is a round base, made of sugar or flour dough, on which a hard-boiled egg is placed, haminados, and three strips of dough on top.

The Polares that were added to Ladino speaker’s mishloach manot. “Platikos” – Sephardic mishloach manot. Photo: SARA Baruch SUFRIN
The Polares that were added to Ladino speaker’s mishloach manot. “Platikos” – Sephardic mishloach manot. Photo: SARA Baruch SUFRIN

The Jews of Thessaloniki used to add NOVIYOS-I (brides) and NOVYIKAS (grooms), in the form of brides and grooms, to Platikos intended especially for bachelors and bachelorettes as a wish for a successful marriage.

The world of Ladino speakers is full of proverbs and sayings. Most holiday proverbs include the name of the holiday, but even without mentioning the name of the holiday, it is possible to understand which holiday the proverb refers to. These proverbs were only one of the tools our ancestors used to educate and pass on heritage and values. Here are some proverbs and expressions about Purim:

DESPUES DE PURIM PLATIKO – mishloach manot delivered after Purim (something done at the wrong time)

LE KANTO LAS DE PURIM – sang him Purim songs (gave him “mana”)

ONDE VAN PLATIKOS TORNAN CHANAKITAS – He who sends portions, receives bowls (the giver receives back in abundance).

Happy Purim!

Leah and Ido, my grandchildren, happily join the Platikos assembly.: “Platikos” – Sephardic mishloach manot. SARA SUFRIN
Leah and Ido, my grandchildren, happily join in the Platikos assembly.: “Platikos” – Sephardic mishloach manot. SARA SUFRIN
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